Articles Posted in recent news

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Phoenix LogoEmployee exposure to and lack of protection from highly flammable and potentially fatal chemicals has caused the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration to cite and fine a Connecticut chemical manufacturer.

Phoenix Products Co. violated 15 requirements of workplace safety regarding chemicals and will be charged with a $61,600 fine.

The company produces both swimming pool chemicals as well as chemicals found in nail polish remover. Their processes deal with highly combustible substances such as acetone and isopropyl alcohol 99 percent that could easily put workers’ lives in danger. For this reason, OSHA has a required process safety management program that Phoenix Products Co. failed to provide.

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Roof SafetyA Massachusetts roofing contractor is facing major fines for yet again placing its employees in potential life-threatening working environments.

The guilty party, A S General Construction Inc., has had repeated offenses of failing to provide their workers with both the fall protection and proper safety training that the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration requires.

This time, the company had employees working on an unguarded roof 26 feet from the ground, connected only by an incorrectly crafted ladder-jack scaffold.

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OSHA and Industrial Truck Association WorkersThrough a renewed alliance with the Industrial Truck Association, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is working to minimize the amount of injuries and deaths related to powered industrial trucks. The renewed alliance is for another five years, and the primary topics of interest over this time will include tip-over and struck-by dangers.

For those employees who work with these trucks, the alliance will serve to provide more efficient resources and training so that potential life threatening dangers can be more readily recognized and accidents can be prevented.

Other OSHA promotions that will be pushed through this alliance include preventing falls, heat illness, and supporting a “culture of safety.” This culture includes preventing workers from being crushed under fallen equipment such as forklifts.

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19-year-old Mason Cox was killed after being pulled into a wood chipper in Kings Mountain, North Carolina.

Reports say Cox was trying to kick a tree branch that he was loading into the chipper when his leg got caught in the tree branch.

Cox had just recently been hired by Crawford’s Tree and Stump Grinding Service and the accident occurred on his first day on the job.

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In Pennsylvania a 10 year old girl is bravely facing a situation that most adults would not be able to handle with such strength and hope. The girl is dying of cystic fibrosis and needs new lungs in order to survive.

Her situation has been growing more desperate and has achieved national attention. Support for the girl’s situation has come from the public after the national media made the situation well known across the country. Judge Michael Baylson, a Federal Court Judge, passed a temporary decision allowing Sarah to be placed on the adult transplant list, which she was previously not allowed to be on according to the “Under 12 rule” which does not allow children under the age of 12 to be on the adult transplant list.

According to medical experts, lung transplants are the hardest transplants to perform, and giving adult lungs to children is even more difficult to do successfully. If the policy is changed there would be approximately 8-11 children added to the list of already over 1500 people waiting for lung transplants. Many are saying that it should not be up to a judge to decide what to do with transplant organs, especially when the decision goes against what the doctors say.