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OSHA CITES SCRANTON TIRE COMPANY FOR WORK PLACE HAZARDS

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited Scranton Dunlop Inc., doing business as Sandone Tire, for 19 safety violations, including four repeated, at its Scranton facility.
Proposed penalties total more than $58,000.
OSHA initiated an inspection as part of its Site-Specific Targeting Program for industries with high injury rates.
The repeated violations, which carry penalties of $26,600, include failing to ensure that open-sided floors and/or platforms four feet or higher were guarded with railings and toe boards; failing to ensure employees were able to open an exit door from the inside at all times without keys, tools or special knowledge; failing to properly guard pulleys with parts seven feet or lower from the floor or work platform; failing to properly guard horizontal belts; failing to provide proper covers for all pull boxes and fittings; and failing to install face plates for snap switches mounted on boxes.
The company was cited for the same violations in 2008.
The serious violations include failing to provide railings and other guards for stairways; failing to provide intermediate railings in other areas; failing to provide water sprinklers for a paint spray booth; failing to make portable fire extinguishers available and accessible; failing to train workers on using fire extinguishers and forklifts; failing to correct a variety of electrical hazards; failing to inspect powered industrial trucks; failing to secure lifted loads; and failing to separate oxygen and fuel-gas cylinders.
Four other-than-serious violations include uncovered floor holes, substandard exit signs, inadequate inspection of the energy control program and unlabeled hazardous chemical containers.
According to an OSHA news release, Sandone Tire, which employs about 75 workers, has 15 business days from receipt of the citations to comply, ask for an informal conference with OSHA’s area director or contest the citations and proposed penalties before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.